1984: The start of implantology subcontracting

In 1977, Roger and René Anthoine split Anthogyr into two businesses, which were determined by drawing straws. Roger became the owner of the flourishing, lucrative prostheses side of the business, while René received the dental instrument and subcontracting activities, as well as a cash payment to balance out the shares. Left with only 40 employees and half of the machine fleet, Anthogyr also had to pay 50% of the cost of building a new factory, since the two businesses would now operate in separate locations. 


Dr Gérard Scortecci 

The new departure of Anthogyr, which Claude Anthoine took over in 1979, was also marked by the arrival of a brand-new product in its order book. In the early 1980s, Dr. Gérard Scortecci, developed the disc implant, a new device with broad applications.

"In seeking out a manufacturer able to keep up with him, Dr. Gérard Scortecci turned to a maker of wood parts in southern France, who then turned to Anthogyr"

In seeking out a manufacturer able to keep up with him, Dr. Scortecci turned to a maker of wood parts in southern France, who then turned to Anthogyr. The initial implants were made on a Tornos lathe, which used a set of cams able to work with a metal that was new at the time: titanium. Highly flammable, titanium was the cause of several machine fires—an event that would be inconceivable today, since processes have been perfected. A few months later, Dr. Scortecci presented his invention at an annual congress of the French Dental Association (Association Dentaire Française).

 


Cross-section of the disc implant invented by dental surgeon Gérard Scortecci (opposite), reproduced in the patent filed on April 1, 1986.

When he visited Anthogyr’s booth  holding a small box containing the famous implants, Claude Anthoine was stunned to see parts that had been made in his own workshop. Anthogyr was entrusted with making the prototypes and with preproduction and mass production of the implants under the Victory brand.